Literature and Things

I’ve been reading a lot lately – last night I finished Aphra Behn’s The Feigned Courtesans which is a really fun play in the style of Shakespeare with some cool non-extreme feminism. My favorite lines were these two, and why.

“When you’re gone, the world cries, ‘she had not wit enough to keep him,’ when indeed you are not fool enough to be kept.”

Thank you for pointing out that things can go contrary to the way popular opinion likes to see them. Also, I like that this shows that both sexes can be stupid, human and flawed. I don’t really like the premise that women have to keep men, as though women cannot hold the attention of a man or as though men cannot focus on one woman, which I have seen disproved by the many stellar marriages I have been fortunate to hang around observing. My parents come to mind.

“I have a soul…and that’s all love; And I’ll the talent which heaven lent improve.”

This is great and a bit L’Engleish. Cool thought progression: God is love –> man is made in God’s image –> man is love, as well. HEY NEAT. WE ARE LOVE. In fact, we love because he first loved us. So that all fits together. But this also reminds me of a bit from L’Engle’s Camilla, which follows:

“Well,” I said at last, “I don’t think it’s God’s fault when people do anything wrong. And I don’t think He plans it when people are good. But I think He makes it possible for people to be ever so much bigger and better than they are. That is, if they want to be. What I mean is, people have to do it themselves. God isn’t going to do it for them.”

I have been watching John Green’s Crash Course Literature videos, as well, and having read the Odyssey (albeit distractedly) and Sophocles I appreciated the insight, though my actual understanding of Hamlet is more limited.

Anyway, in his discussion of Sophocles John talked about Aristotle, and now I really want to know what my father thinks about Aristotle, and that’s what I’ve been thinking about.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s